The interplay of lines and surfaces, together with perfectly balanced proportions, creates a sculptural kitchen decor of unique beauty and timeless elegance.
/We%20Visit%20You%20At%20Home
We Visit You At Home

That's right. We come to you instead of you coming to us. We will measure your kitchen. Then we ask you questions and start the actual design process with you.

/Preliminary%20Computer%20Designs
Preliminary Computer Designs

We will use the measurements we took of your kitchen to put together preliminary designs of your new kitchen. Then we discuss and adjust with you at our second meeting.

/Begin%20The%20Detailed%20Design%20Process
Begin The Detailed Design Process

Once we have the preliminary designs complete, we will begin to put together detailed designs for you, which include specific cabinets, appliances, floors, etc.

Kitchens and style collections

Kitchens and style collections
Pure
A fundamental simplicity that is understood the world over. A relaxed spirit that inspires. Here, one's personality can unfold. Because here people are the center of attention, not furniture.
Kitchens and style collections
Urban
To those who love urban life, it’s not loud but full of life; not anonymous but social; not hectic but exciting, inspiring, and colorful. The city is a place of possibilities where everyone can find their niche.
Kitchens and style collections
Classic
To love the classics, you do not have to be a traditionalist. Whether it's clothes, cars, music or furniture, what connects "classic" lovers around the world is enthusiasm for craftsmanship and authenticity.

Spotlight on Butcher Block Countertops: Are They Right For You?

There's something special about an oiled wooden countertop. Butcher block countertops are the descendants of noble cutting blocks that go back centuries. The countertops of today still use the same construction techniques: read on to find out if you want to go with edge grain or end grain.

The post Spotlight on Butcher Block Countertops: Are They Right For You? appeared first on Kitchen Cabinet Kings Blog.


There's something special about an oiled wooden countertop. Butcher block countertops are the descendants of noble cutting blocks that go back centuries. The countertops of today still use the same construction techniques: read on to find out if you want to go with edge grain or end grain.

The post Spotlight on Butcher Block Countertops: Are They Right For You? appeared first on Kitchen Cabinet Kings Blog.

Light butcher block countertops in a sunny kitchen
Today, you literally have hundreds of options for kitchen countertops. Quartz and granite are staples, and they have been for many years. However, when you’re talking about culinary history, butcher blocks have a deeper provenance. Butcher block countertops can look great in both modern and traditional kitchens. Since they have a natural wood finish, they can bring a familiar feeling into the kitchen. In this post, we’ll take a look at what butcher block countertops are and help you decide if they are right for you.

What is a butcher block?

A butcher block is a large slab that is made up of straight cuts of wood. Traditionally, butcher blocks were used by actual butchers. The first versions were just thick horizontal slices of trees. Those evolved into butcher block tables made from pieces of wood. These tables weighed a ton and could be two feet thick or more. Since they were a butcher’s primary cutting area, they were designed to last a lifetime. Some European countries still use this type of butcher block for food preparation today.

The butcher block countertops of today descend from those noble origins. They are still created to be sturdy and to last for many years. However, the countertops of today are much thinner and are usually one to four inches thick. You can use butcher block countertops for an entire kitchen, or you can feature just one part of your kitchen with the countertop.

Three types of butcher block countertops

There are three main types of butcher block countertops, and they are differentiated by the grain of wood showing on the top side.

1. Face grain

Dark wood face grain butcher board

In this type, boards are laid out flat side-by-side to make the butcher block. The top side of the counter is made from the faces of the boards—instead of the ends or sides. This type is the most susceptible to scratches and marks, so it’s not the best choice if you plan on using your countertop surface for a lot of chopping. However, if you use cutting boards most of the time, this can be a great option as it may be cheaper in some situations.

2. Edge grain

Edge grain butcher block countertop

Edge grain butcher block still uses the boards lengthwise, but this time the faces are glued together and the edges are exposed to the top. Because of the orientation of the wood grain, edge grain is more durable than face grain. It stands up to knife-wounds well and is also an affordable option. It also happens to be the most popular type of butcher block configuration.

3. End grain

End grain butcher block countertop

By now you can probably guess what type of cut makes this style. End grain butcher block orients the ends of wood pieces towards the top side. When you look at this type of countertop, you’ll see squares of wood with their tree rings exposed (you can see this in the photo above).

This is the most durable and sought after type of butcher block, and it’s also the most expensive. Many end grain arrangements alternate types of wood to create a checkerboard pattern, and they can look truly lavish in the right environments.

It’s expensive because it takes more labor to produce: instead of gluing boards together, the manufacturer has to glue together hundreds of small pieces to cover the same area. End grains also hide knife marks well. The grains can even close up and erase marks over time. That makes this type of butcher block countertop especially suited for active cooks.

How much do they cost?

Butcher block is a pretty affordable option for a custom countertop project. Depending on the grain and wood type you prefer, the cost of supplies can be between $20 and $60 per square foot. That’s not bad at all. If you have a professional do the installation, you can add $5 to $10 to each square foot.

If you’re handy around the house, you can even do it yourself. Wood is a whole lot easier to work with than concrete, marble, or stainless steel, so these countertops can be very DIY-friendly. All you need to do is cut a slab of wood to the size of your counter, cut some holes for your fixtures, and screw it down. You can buy pre-made butcher block sections at stores like IKEA.

Just be aware that a wood countertop can expand and contract 1/8th of an inch each year. Install the counter 1/8th inch away from your walls, otherwise, you’ll end up with a warped kitchen counter. Also, a butcher block countertop works best when installed over open cabinet tops rather than a solid underlayment.

Are butcher block countertops durable?

Butcher block is more durable than laminate and lasts about as long as granite—20 years with proper care. Now, “proper care” might require a little more effort on your part than other types of countertops.

Wood is a cellular material that reacts to moisture. To keep it looking fresh, you should oil your countertop every month. You may also have to avoid cutting directly on the wood depending on the type used. For example, Appalachian Red Oak is an open-grained wood. This gives it a lot of visual interest, but it’s also more susceptible to knife marks and stains.

Every ten years, you should also do a deep refinish. Sand off the top layer of wood (start with 80 grit and work up to 220). After the sanded wood is smooth, re-oil the countertop to give it a new life.

You can also do a miniature version of this 10-year refresh if a certain part of your counter is plagued by marks and scratches. Just sand the affected area with fine-grained sandpaper in the direction of the grain. After you’ve buffed out the marks, apply some oil to that area. With just a little care, butcher block countertops can last many years.

The post Spotlight on Butcher Block Countertops: Are They Right For You? appeared first on Kitchen Cabinet Kings Blog.


Read full article on Kitchen Renovation Guide


How to Maintain Modular Kitchen

Why is Sleek a specialist in Modular kitchen? Sleek has an experience of over 17 years in the modular kitchen industry and hence understands the consumer's taste very well. Sleek also has an inhouse team of designing professionals. From customized modular kitchen solutions within a budget to easy installment of the kitchen, Sleek stands true to its specialist image.

Home Decorating Trends

Stock Cabinet Express