The interplay of lines and surfaces, together with perfectly balanced proportions, creates a sculptural kitchen decor of unique beauty and timeless elegance.
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We Visit You At Home

That's right. We come to you instead of you coming to us. We will measure your kitchen. Then we ask you questions and start the actual design process with you.

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Preliminary Computer Designs

We will use the measurements we took of your kitchen to put together preliminary designs of your new kitchen. Then we discuss and adjust with you at our second meeting.

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Begin The Detailed Design Process

Once we have the preliminary designs complete, we will begin to put together detailed designs for you, which include specific cabinets, appliances, floors, etc.

Kitchens and style collections

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Pure
A fundamental simplicity that is understood the world over. A relaxed spirit that inspires. Here, one's personality can unfold. Because here people are the center of attention, not furniture.
Kitchens and style collections
Urban
To those who love urban life, it’s not loud but full of life; not anonymous but social; not hectic but exciting, inspiring, and colorful. The city is a place of possibilities where everyone can find their niche.
Kitchens and style collections
Classic
To love the classics, you do not have to be a traditionalist. Whether it's clothes, cars, music or furniture, what connects "classic" lovers around the world is enthusiasm for craftsmanship and authenticity.

What’s the Difference between Shellac, Polyurethane, Varnish, and Lacquer?

Whether you're refinishing an old dresser or installing a DIY bar top in your basement, you'll want to pick the best top coat for your situation. These different finishes all bring out the natural qualities of wood and help to protect it for years to come.

The post What’s the Difference between Shellac, Polyurethane, Varnish, and Lacquer? appeared first on Kitchen Cabinet Kings Blog.


Whether you're refinishing an old dresser or installing a DIY bar top in your basement, you'll want to pick the best top coat for your situation. These different finishes all bring out the natural qualities of wood and help to protect it for years to come.

The post What’s the Difference between Shellac, Polyurethane, Varnish, and Lacquer? appeared first on Kitchen Cabinet Kings Blog.

Polyurethane, shellac, varnish, or lacquer, does it really matter? Of course it does. Some of these top coats dry while others cure. Some are better for outdoors, and others for your antique nightstand. In this article, we’ll cover the differences between each of these so you can make the best choice on a durable finish for your project.

Overview

All of these finishes are used on wood, but each one is a bit different. That means they have different applications, and you should find out which one to use for your project. Here’s a quick overview of each and its drying time:

  • Shellac: A natural finish derived from the lac bug, it imparts a warm tone and adds depth to grain. (Drying time: 30 mins)
  • Polyurethane: A synthetic finish made from plastic resin and available in water- or oil-based forms. (Drying time: 2 hours for water-based and 6 hours for oil-based)
  • Varnish: Made from solvents, resins, and oils, varnish is durable and mainly used outdoors. (Drying time: 24 hours)
  • Lacquer: A crystal-clear and durable synthetic finish that can create an ultra high-gloss surface. (Drying time: 1 hour)

And here’s an overview of what each type of finish is best used for:

  • Easiest to apply: Polyurethane and sprayed lacquer
  • Best clear finish: Lacquer
  • Best golden glow: Shellac or oil-based polyurethane
  • Easiest to repair: Lacquer
  • Easiest to clean up: Water-based polyurethane
  • Best for outdoors: Varnish
  • Most durable: Polyurethane or lacquer

Shellac

Hand-inlaid Venetian nightstand with traditional shellac top coat.
Shellac is made from combining a solvent with the secretion of the female lac beetle, which looks a bit like reddish tree sap. When combined with a solvent like alcohol, the mixture can be used as a finish to protect wood furniture and other items.

Shellac has been used since the 1500s and was the most popular top coat until the 1960s. It looks beautiful and can impart a warm glow along with bringing out depth in wood grain. Shellac is a drying finish, which means the solvent simply evaporates. New shellac can slightly dissolve the previous layer and create a seamless finish.

Shellac is best used for pieces of furniture that don’t come in contact with hot items or alcohol. Spilled alcohol can dissolve the finish, and hot mugs or pans will cause white rings to form. That’s why it’s not a good finish for tabletops.

Fun fact: Shellac is the main finish used in French polishing, which artisans apply to pieces of furniture and even musical instruments like classical guitars.

Polyurethane

Rustic kitchen table with a matte polyurethane top coat.
Polyurethane is a synthetic finish that cures as it dries. That means it undergoes a chemical process that can’t be reversed. This makes it very durable since it resists a variety of chemicals once cured.

On the other hand, it’s harder to do touch-up work later on if you make mistakes when applying the finish. Multi-coat projects require sanding between coats since the new layer won’t dissolve or bond with the old layer on its own.

This top coat comes in two varieties: water-based and oil-based. The water-based variety dries faster and clearer, while the oil-based variety is slightly more durable but does impart a golden hue to the wood.

People use polyurethane on anything from kitchen tables to bar tops and hardwood floors. It’s a versatile finish and is great for natural wood kitchen cabinets. It’s available in matte to high-gloss textures.

You can spray, wipe, or brush polyurethane onto surfaces. Use a natural brush for oil-based poly and a synthetic brush for water-based poly. The rule here is “Stirred, not shaken.” Don’t shake a can of this top coat otherwise, you’ll create hundreds of tiny bubbles that can ruin your finish.

Varnish

Outdoor table and chairs with a top coat of glossy varnish.
People and manufacturers often use the term “varnish” to signify any type of top coat, but that’s incorrect. Varnish is chemically related to polyurethane, but it has more oil and is more flexible. It also protects well against UV rays, extreme temperatures, and saltwater. This makes it great for outdoor applications, like decks and railings.

Since it’s flexible, it can expand and contract with the wood. People may also use varnish for bathroom furniture for this reason. Varnish also tends to be yellowish in color.

Lacquer

Blue lacquer chest of drawers with china vases and gold hardware.
Lacquer has been around for thousands of years. It was originally made from tree sap, but modern versions use acrylic resin or cellulose dissolved in solvents. The solvents evaporate quickly, so most lacquers are sprayed on. It leaves a hard and glossy surface that is very durable.

Many Asian-inspired furniture pieces use lacquer as a top coat, though traditional lacquerware is often handmade and expensive. The Japanese lacquer technique of urushi is still practiced today. In this technique, many layers of lacquer create a deep and radiant finish on furniture pieces, bowls, and writing instruments. The photo below is an urushi lacquer Cup of Noodle created by Japanese designer Nendo.

Black urushi lacquer Cup of Noodle with gold and red trim.
Now that you have a better idea of the differences between these materials, you’ll be better prepared when you walk down the top coat aisle of your favorite home improvement store.

The post What’s the Difference between Shellac, Polyurethane, Varnish, and Lacquer? appeared first on Kitchen Cabinet Kings Blog.


Read full article on Kitchen Renovation Guide


How to Maintain Modular Kitchen

Why is Sleek a specialist in Modular kitchen? Sleek has an experience of over 17 years in the modular kitchen industry and hence understands the consumer's taste very well. Sleek also has an inhouse team of designing professionals. From customized modular kitchen solutions within a budget to easy installment of the kitchen, Sleek stands true to its specialist image.

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